3XN Architects Studio Tour, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace

3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace
3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace

3xn Architects Copenhagen Studio Tour.
Photography © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace.

 

During RISING Architecture Week 2015, we had an the incredible studios of and their research arm . I knew very little about this practice before the tour, which I found not only informative but also incredibly inspiring. Some of you may be familiar with 3XN’s work – the practice won the prominent international competition last year to re-design the “50 Bridge Street” AMP tower and masterplan for the . It was thrilling to see the model for this project taking pride of place in the office, and hear more about it first hand from Kim Herforth Nielsen, founding partner and creative director of 3XN.

After outgrowing their old studio in the colourful Christianshavn neighbourhood, 3XN’s recent move saw the practice undertake a transformational renovation of a historic and listed canon boat sheds on Holmen in Copenhagen, resulting in a spectacular new environment. Once used to store, repair and build warships, the waterfront building dates back to 1826. The floor of the entire building slopes slightly towards the canal, once allowing the workmen to slide the boats directly out into the water.

 

3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace

3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace

3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace

3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace

3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace
3XN Architects Copenhagen Studio Tour with Kim Herforth Nielsen.
Photography © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace.

 

The studio is entered at the highest level, providing an immediate overview of the entire space – it’s imposing rustic timber structure, skylights flooding the space with natural light, and the impressive huge full-height windows at the lower level overlook the canal and give glimpses of colourful houses in Christiania on the opposite bank. The office now measures 2,000 sqm allowing plenty of room for an in-house model-making room. Hundreds upon hundreds of different models of various projects (completed, underway and competitions gained and lost) are all spread out throughout the studio for everyone to appreciate. Model-making is a critical part of 3XN’s design process – for each project between 10-20 models are produced (varying in scale and level of finish). Kim believes this is a crucial way that enables the team to “feel the building” during the design process.

The studio is designed as a large open space, with meeting facilities located between the lunchroom and the rest of the office. All the staff sit back to back, which allows easy sharing with the rest of the team on what everyone is working on much more easily, as teammates simply need to turn their chairs to see their colleague’s computer screen. This approach also allows everyone to have direct visual access to the waterfront view. The meeting rooms are designed like rooms within the room. Together with the model-making workshop, they are the only partitioned areas within the office, maintaining a transparent feel courtesy of deliberate use of clear glass walls. The open environment contributes to a creative and interactive space, where sharing of knowledge and interconnectivity amongst the studio’s architect’s comes naturally.

 

3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace

3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace

3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace

3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace3XN Architects Copenhagen, Rising Architecture Week 2015, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace

GXN Studio Space in Copenhagen.
Photography © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace.

 

3XN also has an impressive research arm GXN, established in 2007 as the studio’s own innovation unit. GXN’s mission is to collect the latest knowledge on materials and new technologies, and apply these findings to the studio’s architecture. The work of GXN is supported by the office or funded by research grants, specifically in terms of innovation in materials. The team have undertaken material experiments such as transforming tomato stem boards and seaweed for building partitions. The GXN lab is an open space, allowing everyone to browse through various textures, materials and a myriad of experiments. This part was absolutely thrilling to see. The research section also houses a machine, reminiscent of a mini greenhouse, that grows mint – mostly just for fun (and Friday drinks) at this stage.

 

Related Post: RISING Architecture Week Copenhagen 2015.

 


[All images © Nick Hughes / Yellowtrace.]

 



About The Author

Dana Tomić Hughes
Founder & Editor

Dana is an award-winning interior designer living in Sydney, Australia. With an unhealthy passion for design, Dana commits to an abnormal amount of daily design research. Regular travel and attendance at premier design events, enables Dana to stay at the forefront of the design world globally. While she is super serious about design, Dana never takes herself - nor design - too seriously. Together with her life and business partner, Dana is Boss Lady at Studio Yellowtrace, specialising in Design Strategy, Creative Direction and Special Projects. The studio takes a highly conceptual and holistic approach to translating brands & ideas into places & experiences.

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