Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Erica-Overmeer.

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Erica-Overmeer.

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Erica-Overmeer.

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Erica-Overmeer.

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Erica-Overmeer.

 

Ladies & Gentlemen, I think we have a contentious one on our hands – thoughts and feelings Yellowtracers? Admittedly this isn’t the most wholesome of dwellings, but we’re all about celebrating design diversity around here and this house by is certainly a conversation starter. Personally, I like it. I find it eerie, strange and ultimately seductive. There’s something so appealing about the brutalist feel of the rough and ready materials, unadorned walls and endless grey tones.

Aptly named ‘Antivilla’ for its rebellious virtues, this weekend home for Brandlhuber himself explores sustainable building techniques and questions our expectations of what a liveable space should be. Formally a hosiery factory, this spacious 500 sqm home and artist’s studio is located on the shores of Krampitz Lake in Germany. Instead of converting the building into detached houses or a luxurious lakeside villa, the architects decided to be experimental and collaborative with their approach.

 

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Erica-Overmeer.

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Erica-Overmeer.

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Erica-Overmeer.

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Erica-Overmeer.

 

Some of the changes included wrapping the building in shotcrete and converting the gable end roof into a flat roof with a sculptural rainspout that cantilevers off the southern elevation. The most striking feature of this house has to be those huge, misshapen windows. In order to create these ruin-like openings the architects invited friends, family and artists to take swings at the wall with a sledgehammer! How fun would that be? What I can’t get over however is the full height window on the first level that opens up completely with nothing but 2 meagre pieces of wire to stop you from falling off the edge. Combine that with zero handrails or balustrades throughout and it’s safe to say we’re not in Kansas anymore… and I kind of love it!

The crude and course exterior gives way to a bright and uncluttered interior with crisp furnishings, chandeliers and the odd animal fur spread throughout. The artists who inhabit the ground floor enjoy a totally column free space to exhibit their works made on-site.

 

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Baunetz.

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Barbara Ingenweyen.

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider | Yellowtrace
Photo © Jan Oliver Kunze.

 

Instead of using conventional forms of heating and insulation, a central concrete core that houses the kitchen, sauna and fireplace is enough to sufficiently heat the first floor living space. Heavy PVC curtains that are flanked by softer fabric can be opened and closed to create different temperature zones. In summer the usable living area is large and expansive while in winter you might close off the curtains and circulate intimately around the warm hearth. This unconventional way of dealing with seasonal comfort didn’t quite fly with energy-saving regulations and so an under-floor heating system was installed as a back up.

Antivilla may not be your cup of tea but conceptually and formally there’s more than meets the eye. It’s unapologetically ballsy and I can’t help but admire the bold way in which Brandlhuber has approached climate concepts and radical adaptive reuse with this unconventional dwelling.

 

 


[Photography credits as noted.]

 

About The Author

Fenina Acance

Architecting away in Melbourne, Fenina is a shameless fashion, art and design fanatic who loves defying the relentless Melbournian uniform of black on black on black. Often spotted strutting a boisterous mix of pattern and colour, her eclectic love for the bold, raw and textured fuels her passion for design and contemporary art. When not indulging in Cy Twombly’s sensitive scribbles or Serra’s evocative sculptural forms, her love for everything Italian consumes the rest of her time. Whether it’s the language, design or food (especially food), Fenina is obsessed!

4 Responses

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.