Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace
LOT II, 2012.

Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace
BORDER III, 2011.

Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace
ANOTHER SINGULARITY, 2008 – 2009.

Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace
ANOTHER SINGULARITY, 2008 – 2009.

Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace
BREATHING ROOM, 2006 – 2012.

Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace
FIRMAMENT III, 2009.

Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace
BLIND LIGHT, 2007.

 

British artist  is widely acclaimed for his sculptures, installations and public artworks that investigate the relationship of the human body to space. His work has been widely exhibited throughout the UK and in major international exhibitions at Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil, São Paulo, Rio di Janeiro and Brasilia; Deichtorhallen, Hamburg; The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg; Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria; Hayward Gallery, London; Malmö Konsthall, Sweden and Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark (1989). In other words – he is kind of a big deal.

 

Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace

Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace

Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace

Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace

Sculptures & Installation Art by Antony Gormley | Yellowtrace
BREATHING ROOM, 2006 – 2012.

 

Gormley’s series “BREATHING ROOM, 2006 – 2012” (above) of three-dimensional drawing in space is what I’m particularly drawn to. Both a diagram and an object, they redefine the very idea of space. According to Gormley “it is an instrument that allows the viewers to become the viewed by creating an interpenetrating nest of seven space frames that occupy a central position in the room.” The volume outlined by the frame remains constant whilst being extended in each case on a different axis. A mandala-like drawing on the floor forms the plan from which the seven ‘rooms’ grow. The structure is made from 25 mm x 25 mm square aluminium tube.

The object hovers between being architecture and being an image of architecture – a contained object in a defined internal space. In the Ropac Gallery installation, all the lights were removed and the frames were painted with two layers of phosphorescent paint that absorbed light during the day and emitted it at night. In it’s night-mode the work assumes an unstable position between the virtual and the real. That’s extreme levels of love right there!

Check out for an insight into his art practice and his process.

 


[Images courtesy of .]

 



About The Author

Dana Tomić Hughes
Founder & Editor

Dana is an award-winning interior designer living in Sydney, Australia. With an unhealthy passion for design, Dana commits to an abnormal amount of daily design research. Regular travel and attendance at premier design events, enables Dana to stay at the forefront of the design world globally. While she is super serious about design, Dana never takes herself - nor design - too seriously. Together with her life and business partner, Dana is Boss Lady at Studio Yellowtrace, specialising in Design Strategy, Creative Direction and Special Projects. The studio takes a highly conceptual and holistic approach to translating brands & ideas into places & experiences.

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