Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

 

Located in the northern Chinese city of Harbin, this Architect’s creation is an exceptional beauty. Fluid and sinuous in form, the intersection between landscape and built form is intentionally blurred ever so beautiful and operatically. The connection between music, theatre and an intentional escape from the rigid reality of business and the daily life, is ever so apparent, and so handsomely conceived. Offering over 80,000 square meters of built area that’s able to accommodate over 1600 patrons, with 400 in a smaller theatre, the Harbin Opera House is a thing of absolute awe.

Formally, the main influences are the contextual site conditions, history and the rural city’s natural and unruly wilderness and climatic conditions. This northern area of China is known for its extreme winds and consequent sculptural landscapes, shaped by those winds. This Opera House is a veritable nod to that heritage and the forces of nature at play. Clad conclusively in white aluminium panels, the seamless nature of these scales creates a push-pull affect with the neighbouring typography and terrain. The way in which each piece of the façade interconnects with the next appears completely seamless, evoking a sense of poetic effortlessness.

 

Related Story: Deliciously Curvalicious.

 

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

Harbin Opera House by MAD Architects | Yellowtrace

 

The organic nature of the building as a whole, as an external skin, transfers not just through to the landscape and master-planning efforts, but also to the interiors. The intentional space planning embodies that same sense of flow as the exterior. There is almost a cocoon-type space created through this wrapping of spaces and materiality. The use of warm natural materials within also aids in the crafted sense of belonging, the arrival, and the idea of being in the hearth of the space; at the core of the creation. Stone floors, curving glass walls and the canyon-like spaces create this deliberate warmth.

Based in Beijing, MAD has used all its cards on this one, utilising all available technology to bring this futuristic vision to life. Opened in 2015, an engineering, documentation and design feat, the Harbin Opera House is beyond its time, and ever so beautifully so. Huge nods to MAD Architects and all visionaries involved; truly worthy of a standing ovation.

 

 


[Images courtesy of & .]

 



About The Author

Bronwyn Marshall

Spawn from the peaceful pastures of Adelaide, Bronwyn is inspired by the undiscovered. With travel as her main muse and together with a belief that architecture and design can facilitate a better world, she currently finds herself living and working in NYC. An Architect and designer of over eight years, she thrives on interpreting other people’s passions into manifested realities. Listening to and seeing new worlds through her own lens has seen her work and study on an international scale; in Europe, Australia and currently, in the US. Influenced by minimalism in all its glory, in practice and everyday life, her obvious influencers are notably the Scandinavian and Japanese design greats. Her work spans residential, hospitality, retail, health, education and industrial portfolios and has a strong passion for Humanitarian work and the real possibilities of design thinking in the developing world. She thinks big and laterally, and open to musings from all directions. Naive or otherwise, she really does believe design can make a difference.

One Response

  1. kennethmason1kapm

    Attractive, fluid and organic. Modern without forgetting it’s roots. The warm wood keeps the concrete/marble (?) from become too chilly. The seating area is almost beyond words. I hope the acustics are as good as it’s looks. Love the huge open areas, but like most theater type buildings they call out for so seating. Barcelona chairs, with wood tones leather would be wonderful to see. Also a selection of bright primay colors. Hanging planters might be able to capture the cascade effect of the flowing wood.

    kapm

    Reply

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