Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Takumi Ota | #Milantrace2017
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Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace | #Milantrace2017
Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace | #Milantrace2017

Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace | #Milantrace2017

Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace | #Milantrace2017

Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace | #Milantrace2017
Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace | #Milantrace2017
Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace | #Milantrace2017
Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace | #Milantrace2017

Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace | #Milantrace2017

Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace | #Milantrace2017
nendo’s ‘Invisible Outlines’ at Jil Sander showroom during Milan Design Week 2017. Photography © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace.

 

I think we can all agree Nendo‘s fonder Oki Sato is a freak of nature. We’ve talked about the work of this Japanese practice a number of times on these pages. And no matter how many times I experience the studio’s work first hand, I am never left feeling anything less than awe struck. Nendo’s Invisible Outlines, which was on show during Milan Design Week 2017 at Jil Sander’s showroom in Brera, was no different. The exhibition brought together 16 of the studio’s projects, some old some new, each one exploring what happens when boundaries of objects are blurred or enhanced.

“We tend to perceive the existence and positioning of objects by subconsciously following ‘outlines’, and by distinguishing the ‘inside and outside’ of these contours,” explains Oki Sato. “This also means that objects with obscure outlines cannot always be identified as objects, and conversely if outlines are visible, that information which is not visible can be subconsciously supplemented.”

The exhibition took this fundamental principle into account, and several related ideas were implemented as a theme. The existence of items were blurred by manipulating outlines in various ways, giving viewers an opportunity to recognise existence of items visually in their minds by making invisible outlines visible.

The 16 showcased collections included the following: “Border table” which presents a fragmented contour of rooms; “Trace collection”capturing “traces” of movement; “Un-printed material”, a piece that portrays various forms and expressions of paper through outline; “80 sheets of mountains” which features mountain range using outlines with cut and elongated sheet material; “Objectextile” a collaboration project with Jil Sander, where contours of 3D objects were retrieved and turned into textile; “One Stroke” carpet that appears like a drawing using a black pen on white paper; and a new ultra-thin transparent silicon piece that attempts to re-establish the relationship between vase and water with colour boundaries (see little video of the vases in action ).

 

Related Posts:
Highlights From Milan Design Week 2017.

Nendo’s ‘Un-Printed Material’ Exhibition in Tokyo.
Nendo’s Border Table Collection Utilises Corners of Rooms as its Structure.

 

Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Takumi Ota | #Milantrace2017

Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Takumi Ota | #Milantrace2017

Nendo Invisible Outlines at Jil Sander Milan, Photo © Takumi Ota | #Milantrace2017
‘Objectextile’ by nendo for Jil Sander. Photography © Takumi Ota.

 

The exhibition stretched across seven rooms, each one presented in a pristine all-white setting, with a soundtrack of meditative music playing within each space.

Invisible Lines opened with a conceptual project Nendo undertook for Jil Sander. Oki Sato created five 3D objects – made from vertical lines, squares and dots – which were photographed and then translated into textile patterns that became five prototype dresses. In the end, only the dot pattern was retained and turned into a series of products including T-shirts, sneakers, bags and wallets.

I’ll take one of each, thanks!

 

Related Posts:
Highlights From Milan Design Week 2017.

Nendo’s ‘Un-Printed Material’ Exhibition in Tokyo.
Nendo’s Border Table Collection Utilises Corners of Rooms as its Structure.

 

Tourismandhotels travelled to Milan courtesy of Cathay Pacific, who fly to Italy several times each week. Cathay’s great connections from Australia allow getting from Sydney to Milan in under 24 hours, including transit times. For more information visit .

 


[Photography © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace. Press shots by Takumi Ota, courtesy of nendo.]

 



About The Author

Dana Tomić Hughes
Founder & Editor

Dana is an award-winning interior designer living in Sydney, Australia. With an unhealthy passion for design, Dana commits to an abnormal amount of daily design research. Regular travel and attendance at premier design events, enables Dana to stay at the forefront of the design world globally. While she is super serious about design, Dana never takes herself - nor design - too seriously. Together with her life and business partner, Dana is Boss Lady at Studio Yellowtrace, specialising in Design Strategy, Creative Direction and Special Projects. The studio takes a highly conceptual and holistic approach to translating brands & ideas into places & experiences.

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