Laurent Craste Porcelain Art | Yellowtrace

Laurent Craste Porcelain Art | Yellowtrace

Laurent Craste Porcelain Art | Yellowtrace

Laurent Craste Porcelain Art | Yellowtrace

Laurent Craste Porcelain Art | Yellowtrace

 

I think it’s fair to generalise by saying that when we think of porcelain, concepts like pain and violence are the last things on our minds, right? Well, there’s always someone who has a twist on the tradition, which turns us on pretty hard over here at the Yellowtrace HQ. Enter Laurent Craste, Montreal-based, French artist whose contemporary take on ceramics has us feeling all giddy with excitement. Laurent creates his own version of a common object like the vase, adding features such as nails, hooks, axes and other objects to create his uniquely-shaped sculptures.

“My research considers the object as a social indicator, a ‘sign bearer’. Considered as instruments of political power, ideological vehicles, demonstrations of ostentatious luxury and economic power, but also as incarnations of emotions and experiences, the historical archetypes of decorative arts consummately provide me with useful material,” explains the artist.

Seeing his material as a bearer of symbols and social customs, Craste recreates his classic porcelain models by altering their image, commenting on their purpose and re-imagining their form. In the hands of this talented artist, simple vases are elevated into a fun, often politically charged, and above all – a more interesting state of existence. We dig.

 

Related Post: Gettin’ Jiggy With Porcelain.

 

Laurent Craste Porcelain Art | Yellowtrace

Laurent Craste Porcelain Art | Yellowtrace

Laurent Craste Porcelain Art | Yellowtrace

Laurent Craste Porcelain Art | Yellowtrace

Laurent Craste Porcelain Art | Yellowtrace

Laurent Craste Porcelain Art | Yellowtrace

 


[Images courtesy of .]

 



About The Author

Tourismandhotels

Tourismandhotels is a small and highly dedicated bunch of cool kids who assist in the production of design stories, general admin and correspondence associated with each and every post. The team works tirelessly behind the scenes, providing invaluable support to the Editor In Chief. Extreme love and respect to the power of ten!

One Response

  1. Avatar
    kennethmason1kapm

    Porcelain is notoriously difficule to work with. While I can appreciate the depth of knowledge and technique used for these items, I suffered from a visceral reaction to them. I think I might understand what the artist is trying to say; the delicacy and inate beauty of porcelain playing against the starkness of the world it now occupies. Reaction is the same, deep down I find them ugly. Worse yet I find them troubling and upsetting. Once more I can appreciate the skills used to produce them, but I found myself turning away from them. Art that can cause a reaction like this is rare ( IMHO )

    Reply

Leave a Reply