Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
MILANTRACE 2018 Partner Banner | Yellowtrace

 

If you’ve ever travelled to Milan Design Week and Salone Del Mobile, chances are the most common question you got asked upon your return was – How was Milan? Ummmm… Are you for real? As if one can possibly answer this question in a single sentence.

Milan drew a record crowd with some 450,000 people in attendance this year. With over 2,000 exhibitors at the Furniture Fair, and around 1,200 satellite events scattered around the city, how can one possibly answer this seemingly harmless little question? Awesome? Epic? Intense? Overwhelming? A combination of sheer joy and intense moments of frustration? The world’s premier design event is all that and so much more, and I would argue that one’s state of mind plays a pivotal role in how the week is experienced and perceived. Our own expectations, how we engage with the week — i.e. travel at a leisurely pace with a bunch of friends, versus following a carefully planned schedule that leaves little to chance — this has everything to do with how Milan will feel for us.

As for me, I’d go as far as to say this was the most relaxed I’ve been in years, despite the fact our schedule reached an all-time peak of Olympic gold standard variety. And as a result, I’ve probably enjoyed myself more than I have in the past. But how can this be? I put it down to OCD levels of preparation. It sounds like the most unexciting game plan, but this approach ensured I was able to move through the week with grace and not experience perpetual overwhelm and mini-meltdowns. It only took me 9 years, but I can officially say I’ve totally nailed it, and worked out how to tackle Milan like a seasoned pro!

Anyway, for me, 2018 will stick in my mind as the year of the queues. Yes – queues. Not the year that we finally started to move on from our obsession with Millennial Pink, or that we saw an even stronger uptake of traditional crafts. Nor was it the concept of technology being presented experientially and designed much like a product itself. No, I said queues, dammit! Perhaps it was the unseasonably warm weather that drew the unprecedented crowds, or maybe it’s the world’s increased appetite for contemporary design combined with the collective accessibility of Milan through social media and other digital channels. Whatever the reason, queues were long and vicious, and they were everywhere — from entries to exhibitions in town to stands at the Furniture Fair.

There were many, many, many moments I truly cherish from this year, like our visit to Villa Borsani — which architect Osvaldo Borsani built for his twin brother and Tecno co-founder in 1943; Studiopepe’s ‘Club Unseen’ which was probably the coolest event in Milan this year; visit to the SIX Gallery run by the gorgeous and talented young couple Fanny Bauer Grung and David Lopez Quincoces; Hermès show-stopping spectacle at museum La Permanente; SONY’s Hidden Senses which made me cry like a child, etc… I mean, I really could keep going on and on, until the break of dawn. I guess you’ll just have to stay tuned for more of #MILANTRACE2018, or , presented in partnership with , to hear the rest. Something tells me you won’t be disappointed.

Baci, Mama Yellowtrace xx

 

 

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Tourismandhotels travelled to Milan courtesy of Cathay Pacific, who fly to Italy several times each week. Cathay’s great connections from Australia allow getting from Sydney to Milan in under 24 hours, including transit times. For more information visit .

 

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Villa Borsani. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
The previously inaccessible to the public, Villa Borsani opened for the first time. Amongst some of the most cherished experiences for me this year has been our visit to Villa Borsani — which architect Osvaldo Borsani built for his twin brother and Tecno co-founder Fulgenzio in 1943. More to come soon.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Villa Borsani. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Villa Borsani had been unoccupied for 10 years and never before opened to the public, so the family invited curator Ambra Medda to fill it with flowers, artworks, and other everyday objects bringing vibrancy and soulfulness to the previously still and stale home. More to come soon.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Google Installation by Lee Edelkoort at Rossana Orlandi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Google Installation by Lee Edelkoort at Rossana Orlandi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Chatting to trend forecaster Lee Edelkoort in front of her installation for Google at Rossana Orlandi. Lee happens to be the first official ‘participant’ I spoke to at Milan Design Week 2018, and this conversation certainly set the tone for what was going to be a great week. Right: Google installation at Rossana Orlandi.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, NOTHERVIEW at Rossana Orlandi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
ANOTHERVIEW at Rossana Orlandi’s courtyard – an ongoing project that sits at the intersection of product design and video art.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, TGV lamp by Ionna Vautrin for Moustache. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Newly launched TGV lamp by Ionna Vautrin for Moustache. Right: I am so sorry, but have no idea who’s light this is. Can you help?

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Halo light by Studio Mandalaki at Rossana Orlandi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Halo light by Studio Mandalaki at Rossana Orlandi.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Rossana Orlandi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Sculptures & Objects at Rossana Orlandi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Sculptures & Objects at Rossana Orlandi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Rossana Orlandi herself and some very cool sculptures and objects scattered throughout the courtyard and the garden, which opened up at the back of the gallery for the first time this year, making room for a series of design talks.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Pieces by Nada Debs. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Yamakawa Rattan. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Chatting with the lovely and talented Beirut-based Nada Debs. Nada’s marquetry pieces are out of this world. Right: Yamakawa Rattan from Tokyo.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, PET Lamp Ramingining project at Rossana Orladni. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Wonderful to see the PET Lamp Ramingining project at Rossana Orladni. Only two of these lamps were ever made by Alvaro Catalán de Ocón in collaboration with Indigenous Australian weavers. The other lamp was exhibited at part of NGV Triennial in Melbourne, which we’ve previously written about here.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Lexus Design Event 2018 – Limitless Co-Existence by Sota Ichikawa of dNA. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Arcadia by Sara Ricciardi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Dreamy ceiling moment at Lexus Design Event 2018 – Limitless Co-Existence by Japanese architect Sota Ichikawa of dNA (doubleNegatives Architecture). Right: Arcadia by Sara Ricciardi, curated by Alice Stori Liechtenstein and presented by Schloss Hollenegg for Design.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Local Milan No.3 presented by LOCAL DESIGN. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Local Milan No.3 presented by LOCAL DESIGN & curated by Emma Elizabeth. The exhibition brought together the work of 26 Australian designers, becoming the largest independent showcase of Australian design in Milan to date. Amazing! Pieces by Tom Skeehan (arcmahir & lights); Adam Goodrum & Arthur Seigur (marquetry cabinet); Nicholas Fuller (screen).

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Local Milan No.3 presented by LOCAL DESIGN. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Local Milan No.3 presented by LOCAL DESIGN. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Local Milan No.3. Left: Fred Ganim (coffee table in foreground); Jon Goulder for Spence & Lyda (innate chair & side table); Nicholas Fuller (floor lamp); HAVA Studio (both wall mirrors); Jamie Durie (pedestal dining table). Right: Adam Cornish (stools); Charles Wilson (armchair); Ross Gardam (coffee table in foreground).

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Local Milan No.3 presented by LOCAL DESIGN. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Local Milan No.3 presented by LOCAL DESIGN. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Local Milan No.3 presented by LOCAL DESIGN. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Local Milan No.3. Left: Reflecting on the situation in Hava Studio’s mirror. Middle: Daniel Emma (chair, rug & vase). Right: Henry Wilson, probably in the middle of checking Instagram.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Local Milan No.3 presented by LOCAL DESIGN. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Local Milan No.3 presented by LOCAL DESIGN. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Local Milan No.3. Left: Wall lights by Christopher Boots: Right: Tom Fereday (chair), Adam Cornish (stools); Kate Banazi (hyper colour screens).

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ACT III collection by Apparatus. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Super Natural Daydream lighting collection by Giopato&Coombes. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: ACT III collection by Apparatus, inspired by Creative Director Gabriel Hendifar’s Persian heritage. Right: The incredibly beautiful lighting collection ‘Super Natural Daydream’ by Giopato&Coombes.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Garnier & Linker. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Garnier & Linker. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Paris-based Garnier & Linker’s debut in Milan was small but exceptionally beautiful.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Vegan Design – Or the Art of Reduction solo show of Erez Nevi Pana at Garage Sanremo, Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Vegan Design – Or the Art of Reduction was a solo show of Israeli designer Erez Nevi Pana at Garage Sanremo, curated by Maria Cristina Didero and produced by 5vie. The Eindhoven Design Academy graduate showcased a unique approach to the world of design: with integrity and without guilt.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights,
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights,

Vogue Italia’s Editor-in-Chief Emanuele Farneti invited eight internationally acclaimed designers to develop the Editorial Staff rooms and décor in their own inimitable styles. “Life in Vogue” was a reflection on the way we live in the contemporary office today. Left: Vogue Talents Office by Muller Van Severen. Right: Editor-in-Chief’s own office by Faye Toogood.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights,
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights,

“Life in Vogue”. Left: The Creative Director’s Office by Sabine Marcelis. Right: The Current Affairs Office by Patricia Urquiola.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights,
“Life in Vogue”. Staff Meeting Room by Quinconces–Dragò.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Tram Corallo - Cristina Celestino. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Little moment on board Tram Corallo. Cristina Celestino reimagined a historic 1928 Milan streetcar into a travelling salon that circulated the Brera district.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Studiopepe’s Club Unseen. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Studiopepe’s Club Unseen was, for my money, the coolest event in Milan this year. More to come soon.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Studiopepe at Club Unseen. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Chatting to the super talented Studiopepe’s Arianna Lelli Mami at Club Unseen. More to come soon.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Forms of Moment at Superstudio exhibition in Tortona by Nendo. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Forms of Moment at Superstudio exhibition in Tortona by Nendo. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Oki Sato of Nendo casually hanging at his exhibition Forms of Moment at Superstudio in Tortona, as though his studio hadn’t just turned around 1,239 projects for Milan Design Week. Freak. Right: Detail of one of Nendo’s mind-mending tables at Forms of Moment. My brain hurts.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Forms of Moment at Superstudio exhibition in Tortona by Nendo. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Nendo’s sand clocks dubbed Variations of Time at the Forms of Moment exhibition.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, any/ everyWHERE installation by Neri&Hu for Stellar Works at Tortona. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Industry Dining Armchair by Neri&Hu. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

any/ everyWHERE installation by Neri&Hu for Stellar Works at Tortona. On the left is the newly launched Industry Dining Armchair also by Neri&Hu. .

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, “Hidden Senses” by Sony Design. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, “Hidden Senses” by Sony Design. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

“Hidden Senses” by Sony Design was a huge highlight of the week. This multisensorial experience unfolded over several rooms, visualising an enriched lifestyle for a new tomorrow. The exhibition showed possible interactions between people, objects and spaces, building on the fact that technology is part of our daily life. Left: Shadows cast by two pieces of paper are not real. Right: Colour on the wallplates change in reponse to person’s movement, allowing an individual to paint them in different colours by simply running their hands through the air. Magic.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, “Hidden Senses” by Sony Design. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
“Hidden Senses” by Sony Design. Wall camera turns an image into an instant sketch which projects like an artwork on the wall.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, “Hidden Senses” by Sony Design. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
“Hidden Senses” by Sony Design. Interactive artwork can be changed, turned, zoomed into by simply stepping towards the photo etc. So cool. I was so impressed and so excited at this show, I literally cried like a child.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Envisions for FINSA. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Envisions for FINSA. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Dutch collective Envisions for FINSA continued the excellent exploration into the possibilities of solid surface materials in design.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Boffi Showroom on Via Solferino. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Boffi Showroom on Via Solferino, which now incorporates beautiful furniture form De Padova.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Boffi Showroom on Via Solferino. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Boffi Showroom on Via Solferino. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Boffi Showroom on Via Solferino, which now incorporates beautiful furniture form De Padova.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, DIMOREGALLERY presented Transfer. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, DIMOREGALLERY presented Transfer. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, DIMOREGALLERY presented Transfer. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

DIMOREGALLERY presented Transfer, an installation presented inside tents furnished with historical pieces, and scenes from everyday life.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, DIMORESTUDIO apartment. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, DIMORESTUDIO apartment. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Entry to DIMORESTUDIO apartment.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, DIMORESTUDIO’s Progetto Non Finito. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, DIMORESTUDIO’s Progetto Non Finito. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, DIMORESTUDIO’s Progetto Non Finito. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

DIMORESTUDIO’s Progetto Non Finito, which this year honoures the theme Perfettamente Imperfetto (Perfectly Imperfect), inspired by the Italian middle class of the 60s and 70s.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Brodie Neill’s Made in Ratio presented Focus. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Cabinet by Raw-Edges for Really and Kvadrat. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Brodie Neill’s Made in Ratio presented Focus – collection of four new designs shown alongside some of the brand’s most-recognised works. In this image are Focus coffee table and Rotor stool/ side table from the new collection. . Right: In response to the urgent global issue of waste, Really upcycles end-of-life textiles into new materials. This year, Really and Kvadrat invited Raw-Edges, Front, Benjamin Hubert | LAYER, Christien Meindertsma, Jo Nagasaka, Claesson Koivisto Rune and Jonathan Olivares to create projects with Solid Textile Board and Acoustic Textile Felt. Shown here is cabinet by Raw Edges.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Blocky chairs by Jo Nagasaka for Really and Kvadrat. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Blocky chairs by Jo Nagasaka for Really and Kvadrat.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Vitra’s “Typecasting
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Vitra’s “Typecasting

Vitra’s “Typecasting” was an assembly of iconic, forgotten and new Vitra characters which took place in the former sports arena at La Pelota. Curated by Austrian-born, Paris-based multidisciplinary designer Robert Stadler, Typecasting brought together some 200 objects, drawing on the extensive Vitra archives of classics, prototypes, special editions and future visions. .

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Vitra’s “Typecasting
Typecasting placed a central focus on the social function of furniture in society – and of chairs in particular. Along with their obvious practical use as seating, chairs have historically had an additional representative function: the selection of a specific chair is also a personal act of “image cultivation”.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Observatory by Lee Broom. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Observatory by Lee Broom. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Lee Broom’s Observatory sees the return of British designer’s focus to lighting. Left: Orion modular tube lights with opaque and solid polished gold spheres. Right: Aurora scalable chandeliers of infinite possibilities.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Subtle Deluxe’ furniture collection by BassamFellows. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
BassamFellows presented ‘Subtle Deluxe’ furniture collection, inspired by the sinuous, deceptive simplicity of Mies Van der Rohe’s modernist principle of ‘Less is More’.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Subtle Deluxe’ furniture collection by BassamFellows. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Subtle Deluxe’ furniture collection by BassamFellows. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Right: ‘Subtle Deluxe’ coincides with the launch of BassamFellows’ new range of textiles and transitional furniture for indoor/outdoor. .

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Hem Apartment in Brera. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Dana Tomic Hughes in the palazzo. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Gucci Wall in Brera. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Hem Apartment in Brera. Middle: Dana Tomic Hughes LOLing and blending in with the palazzo. Right: Gucci Wall in Brera, because, well… Gucci.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, David Caon & Christopher Farr presented ‘Ceremony’ at Wallpaper handmade. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, PINCH at Wallpaper handmade. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: At Wallpaper handmade, Australian designer David Caon presented ‘Ceremony’ in collaboration with Christopher Farr – an homage to the traditional Japanese tea ceremony, with a nod to the social aspects of Italian aperitivo. Right: Also at Wallpaper, British brand PINCH presented two new cabinets alongside Achilles, Avery & Emil – their latest dining story shown here.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Breath III by Upon. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Gufram - New pieces from Atelier Biagetti, ROTGANZEN & GGSV. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Breath III by London-based Based Upon is a sculptural piece which recreates ancient rocks, featuring lighting that responds to the viewer’s presence. Amazing! Right: The most fun (and most inappropriate dance moves busted by yours truly) award goes to Disco Gufram. Gufram owner Charley Vezza’s conceptualised a discotheque which celebrated the new pieces created for the brand by Italian studio Atelier Biagetti (Alberto Biagetti & Laura Baldassari), Dutch studio ROTGANZEN (Robin Stam & Joeri Horstink) and French studio GGSV (Gaëlle Gabillet & Stéphane Villard). .

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, New collection from Masiero. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

High-end lighting brand Masiero presented new collections in a seductive space that was once a printing house.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Transitions III: Experimental Inventiveness by Baars and Bloemhoff. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Under the vaults of Ventura Centrale, Baars and Bloemhoff returned with ‘Transitions III: Experimental Inventiveness’, with six leading Dutch design studios who worked their magic to transform with the company’s extensive materials collection.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Transitions III: Experimental Inventiveness by Baars and Bloemhoff. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Baars and Bloemhoff’s ‘Transitions III’ features the work by Bart Joachim van Uden, Christian Heikoop, Floris Wubben, Job van der Berg, Mae Engelgeer and Studio Truly Truly. So, so, sooooo good man!

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Eileen Fisher’s DesignWork presented WASTE NO MORE. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Eileen Fisher’s DesignWork presented WASTE NO MORE – an exhibition curated by Lidewij Edelkoort and Philip Fimmano, which critiqued consumption and shone a light on the emerging circular economy. Right: Fun installation by HARU Japanese Washi tape under the Vaults of Milan’s train station at Ventura Centrale.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Giants With Dwarfs’ by Stephan Hütlemann. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, installation by Antonio Aricò for Una Stanza. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: One of the interactive characters from Stephan Hütlemann’s mesmerising installation ‘Giants With Dwarfs’ for Switzerland’s oldest chair and table manufacturer Horgenglarus. Right: A moving installation by Antonio Aricò for Editamateria furniture brand called ‘Una Stanza’ (A Room).

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, PARADIGM Exhibition by Fabrica with Pierre Frey. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
PARADIGM Exhibition by Fabrica in collaboration with Pierre Frey – a visual exploration of basic human needs questioning the power of the image in contemporary design.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Buro Belén and Sun + at ALCOVA. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Buro Belén and Sun + at ALCOVA – a series of wearables designed to protect people from the sun’s harmful rays.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Series of objects by Bloc Studios at ALCOVA. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Also at ALCOVA, Bloc Studios presented a series of objects created in collaboration with Valentina Cameranesi and Nick Ross, and design studio Objects of Common Interest. Another one of this week’s major highlights.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Bloc Studios. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Bloc Studios - vases by Valentina Cameranesi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Chatting to the clever and talented Sara Ferron Cima of Bloc Studios about boobie vases by Valentina Cameranesi.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Materia Mater by Architetti Artigiani Anonimi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Materia Mater by Architetti Artigiani Anonimi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Materia Mater by Architetti Artigiani Anonimi – collection of furniture made from terracotta that emulates architectural systems on a smaller scale, inspired by the Amalfi coast.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Elemental cabinet by Kostas Lambridis. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Chess game at ALCOVA. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Elemental cabinet by the recent Eindhoven-graduate Kostas Lambridis. This monumental piece is inspired by the 18th-century Badminton cabinet that twice set the record for the most expensive piece of furniture ever sold. Right: A little random moment at ALCOVA of two guys playing chess – presumably a performance piece of sorts as both the sounds of their movements and the chess timer were amplified so they could be heard throughout the space. Only in Milan.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Chairs by Bohinc Studio. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Chairs by Bohinc Studio. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Chairs by Bohinc Studio. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Lunar, Orbit and Solar Chairs by Slovenian-Born, London-based designer Lara Bohinc of Bohinc Studio.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Georgian duo ROOMS solo show. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Georgian duo ROOMS solo show. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Georgian duo ROOMS celebrated 10 years with a solo show which brought together existing pieces and new work, like the Terracotta Totems/ Candleholders on the left and Alchemy Tables on the back right.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Aectual's exhibition at Ventura Future. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Pieces by REM atelier at Ventura Future. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: 3D Print Tech Company Aectual made a beautiful in Milan with an exhibition at Ventura Future in collaboration with DUS architects, showcasing sustainably produced bespoke 3D printed Floors with terrazzo infill. Right: Super cool pieces by REM atelier at Ventura Future.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ANDlight. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, 'DISUSED' installation by Supaform. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Canadian brand ANDlight. Right: Russian studio Supaform’s fun installation called DISUSED.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Victoria Lights by Bethan Gray for Editions Milano. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Tables by Patricia Urquiola for Editions Milano. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Triangoli Marble Vessels by david/nicolas. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

New pieces from Editions Milano left to right – Victoria Lights by Bethan Gray, tables by Patricia Urquiola and Triangoli Marble Vessels by david/nicolas for Editions Milano.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, HAWA Beirut collection by Richard Yasmine. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Lebone lamp by Inès Bressand for Mabeo. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: HAWA Beirut collection by Richard Yasmine. Right: Lebone lamp in Brass by Inès Bressand for Mabeo.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Pieces by Mingardo. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Decò pendant by Federica Biasi; Dome lamp by Valerio Sommella, Minima armchair by Denis Guidone and Gatsby scrren by Federica Biasi for Mingardo.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, New Lights by GABRIEL SCOTT inside Bar Basso. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Futuraforma collection by Marcante-Testa for SEM Spotti Edizioni Milano. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Montreal-based brothers in law, Gabriel Kakon and Scott Richler of GABRIEL SCOTT installed their new lights inside Milan’s institution Bar Basso, renowned as the hub for late-night shenanigans during the design week. Right: Futuraforma collection by Marcante-Testa for SEM Spotti Edizioni Milano.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Pivot by Giacomo Moor. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Check collection by Elisa Ossino for SEM Spotti Edizioni Milano. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Pivot by Giacomo Moor and Right: Check collection by Elisa Ossino for SEM Spotti Edizioni Milano.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Beyond the Deep by Calico Wallpaper and Lindsey Adelman. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Beyond the Deep by Calico Wallpaper and Lindsey Adelman. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Calico Wallpaper and Lindsey Adelman presented Beyond the Deep – a collaborative exhibition that immersed visitors in an aquatic-inspired world of alchemy and decay. The New York-based brand debuted Oceania murals and Drop Lighting respectively.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Lindsey Adelman. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Chatting to the gorgeous Lindsey Adelman.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Homewares Collection from Hermès inside La Permanente. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Homewares Collection from Hermès inside La Permanente. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

In what was easily the week’s most show stopping spectacle, Hermès launched the latest homewares collection inside Milan’s La Permanente art museum. The space was transformed with a series of towering pavilions clad in more than 150,000 handmade Moroccan zellige tiles that gave the sense akin to being under water.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Hermès installation by Charlotte Macaux Perelman. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Hermès installation by Charlotte Macaux Perelman. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Hermès installation by Charlotte Macaux Perelman. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Hermès’ installation was designed by Charlotte Macaux Perelman, and took no less than 3 weeks to build.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Horah by Raw Edges at Spazio Krizia. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Les Petits Nomades’ by Louis Vuitton at Palazzo Bocconi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Horah by Raw Edges at Spazio Krizia. The installation which takes its name from the popular Israeli dance, formed of 30 cast-glass lampshades crafted and engineered by WonderGlass. Right: Entry to Louis Vuitton’s ‘Les Petits Nomades’ travel-inspired home accessories at Palazzo Bocconi.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Les Petits Nomades’ by Louis Vuitton at Palazzo Bocconi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Bomboca Sofa by Fernando & Humberto Campana. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Scenes from Louis Vuitton’s Les Petits Nomades at Palazzo Bocconi. The main hall was animated via a canopy of suspended leather flowers. Right: Bomboca Sofa by Fernando & Humberto Campana.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Les Petits Nomades’ by Louis Vuitton at Palazzo Bocconi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Les Petits Nomades’ by Louis Vuitton at Palazzo Bocconi. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Tropicalist Vase by Humberto & Fernando Campana. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Scenes from Louis Vuitton’s Les Petits Nomades at Palazzo Bocconi. Right: Tropicalist Vase by Humberto & Fernando Campana.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Elle Décor Italia installation at Palazzo Bovara. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Elle Décor Italia installation at Palazzo Bovara. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Elle Décor Italia staged an immersive, multi room installation at Palazzo Bovara, called Onlife: Millennials at Home – a series of spaces where analogue meets digital.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Elle Décor Italia installation at Palazzo Bovara. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Elle Décor Italia installation at Palazzo Bovara. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Scenes from Elle Décor Italia’s Onlife: Millennials at Home at Palazzo Bovara.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Elle Décor Italia installation at Palazzo Bovara. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Living Room sets at Elle Décor Italia’s Onlife: Millennials at Home at Palazzo Bovara.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Gubi installation at Palazzo Serbelloni. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Gubi installation at Palazzo Serbelloni. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Gubi’s installation at Palazzo Serbelloni was quite a spectacle, although one could argue the palazzo setting overwhelmed the furniture in this instance. Left: Pacha Chair originally designed by Pierre Paulin in 1975.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Gubi installation at Palazzo Serbelloni. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Gubi installation at Palazzo Serbelloni. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

More Gubi and Palazzo Serbelloni action.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, v. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Patricia Urquiola for Atelier Swarovski. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Gubi at Palazzo Serbelloni. Right: Patricia Urquiola for Atelier Swarovski – a range of wobbly, flexible containers. So clever.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Double Signature by Doppia Firma. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Always wanted to go inside the amazing leafy building on Via Mozart, just down the road from Villa Necchi, and this year we got the chance to do so with Doppia Firma’s Third Edition called Double Signature.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Kosmos installation by WonderGlass at Via Vivaio. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Fornasetti’s ‘Through The Clouds’ at WonderGlass’ installation at Via Vivaio called Kosmos.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Kosmos installation by WonderGlass at Via Vivaio. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Kosmos installation by WonderGlass at Via Vivaio. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Invisible Cities by J&PEG for WonderGlass was a highlight of Kosmos. The stop-motion film told a surreal tale of a glass ball lost in a magical world that both celebrates the utopian vision of the city and the role of glass within architecture and urban environments.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Alcova by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for WonderGlass. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Alcova by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for WonderGlass. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Alcova by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for WonderGlass is a collection of handcrafted geometric objects that can sit alone or be grouped to create intimate landscapes. Beyond beautiful! .

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Open Sky installation by Phillip K. Smith III for COS. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Open Sky installation by Phillip K. Smith III for COS. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

COS presented Open Sky, a large-scale sculptural installation by artist Phillip K. Smith III, site-specific to Milan’s Palazzo Isimbardi.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Open Sky installation by Phillip K. Smith III for COS. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, 'Surfaces from the Antipodes' by Cleaf with Bestetti Associati and Studiopepe. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Open Sky by Phillip K. Smith for COS. Right: In the courtyards of Palazzo del Senato, home to Milan’s State Archives, Cleaf presented an installation Surfaces from the Antipodes, designed in conjunction with Bestetti Associati and Studiopepe.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Installation at Nilufar Gallery. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Installation at Nilufar Gallery. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Colourful installation on the ground floor of Nilufar Gallery on Via della Spiga. Rug by Pierre Marie. Vintage wall lights from Azucena (1958). Vintage corner cabinet from Fontana Arte (1950s). Velvet upholstered ‘Renaissance table’ & ‘Renaissance Chairs by Roberto Baciocchi for Nilufar Editions. Sputnik Triple floor lamp by Bethan Laura Wood commissioned by Peter Pilotto. Right: On the second floor of Nilufar was Chez Nina – a private club named after Nilufar’s founder Nina Yashar. The club was designed by India Mahdavi as a celebration of Nina’s great passion for India.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, 'Monster Cabart' installation by Lasvit. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, 'Monster Cabart' installation by Lasvit. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Lasvit presented Monster Cabart, a magnificent installation inside Teatro Gerolamo – a puppet theatre modeled on the famous La Scala, and built in 1868. The theatre reopened in 2017 after more than 30 years of closure. In the centre of the space was ‘The Independent’ multimedia totem billboard by Maxim Velčovský. Every hour, Prague´s burlesque dancers took to the stage with a performance that brought together burlesque and light. Totally awesome and so Euro, it hurts! .

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Altered States’ by Snarkitecture for Caesarstone. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Caesarstone presented ‘Altered States’ by Snarkitecture at Fuorisalone at Palazzo dell’Ufficio Elettorale di Porta Romana, which opened to the public for the first time (owned by the founder of Europe Hotels Private Collection).

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Altered States’ by Snarkitecture for Caesarstone. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Altered States’ by Snarkitecture for Caesarstone. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Snarkitecture’s installation explored the core theme of the kitchen island, while looking at water as the most important “ingredient” in the kitchen and drawing inspiration from its changing states in nature (glacier, river, geyser) and in the kitchen (ice, water, steam).

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, HAY x SONOS x WeWork installation at Palazzo Clerici. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, HAY x SONOS x WeWork installation at Palazzo Clerici. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

One of the most ‘vibing’ installations in Milan was HAY x SONOS x WeWork at Palazzo Clerici. Hay furnished the entire palazzo showcasing the versatility of their collections through different settings – from workspaces, living spaces, kitchen & dining etc.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, HAY x SONOS x WeWork installation at Palazzo Clerici. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, HAY x SONOS x WeWork installation at Palazzo Clerici. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

What made the HAY x SONOS x WeWork collaboration particularly successfully was the energetic and friendly vibe established through music which played throughout the Palazzo and its courtyards via the wireless speakers.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, HAY x SONOS x WeWork installation at Palazzo Clerici. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, HAY x SONOS x WeWork installation at Palazzo Clerici. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Palazzo Clerici is a lavish neoclassical former residence adorned with frescoes & 17th-century tapestries, but the presence of contemporary music made the palazzo feel relatable, liveable and accessible. Genius.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, USM stand at RHO Fiera. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Meanwhile at the main fairground at RHO Fiera, USM stand knocked it out of the ballpark.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Kristalia Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Artek Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Kristalia Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. Right: Artek Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, e15 Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Knoll’s Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: e15 Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018.. Right: Corner detail from Knoll’s Modernism-inspired Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. So gewd! 

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Moroso Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Coedition Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Pleasing colour situation on Moroso Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. Right: Coedition Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Established & Sons Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Tonelli Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Crinkled walls at the Established & Sons Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018.. Right: Tonelli Stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. 

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Arflex stand at Salone del Mobile 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, SaloneSatellite 2018 curated by Marva Griffin. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Arflex stand hotness at Salone del Mobile 2018. Right: Scenes from SaloneSatellite 2018, curated by Marva Griffin (who makes a cameo on that TV in the foreground).

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Sakari Hartikainen at SaloneSatellite 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Earnest Studio at SaloneSatellite 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Sakari Hartikainen at SaloneSatellite 2018. Right: Earnest Studio at SaloneSatellite 2018.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Jonas Lutz at SaloneSatellite 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Rust Harvest by Yuma Kano at SaloneSatellite 2018. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Jonas Lutz at SaloneSatellite 2018. Right: Rust Harvest by Yuma Kano at SaloneSatellite 2018.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, 'Silentium' installation by Viabizzuno and HENRYTIMI. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, 'Silentium' installation by Viabizzuno and HENRYTIMI. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Back in town, Viabizzuno and HENRYTIMI staged a sublome installation called Silentium, inside Chiesa di San Marco in Brera. A perfect op for a new profile photo, naturally.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Orto Botanico di Brera. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Small Town installation at Orto Botanico di Brera (Botanical Garden).

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Six gallery by David Lopez Quincoces and Fanny Bauer Grung. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Six gallery by David Lopez Quincoces and Fanny Bauer Grung. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

David Lopez Quincoces and Fanny Bauer Grung (both Piero Lissoni alumnis) are the cool young couple behind Milan’s newest design destination: Six Gallery.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Six gallery by David Lopez Quincoces and Fanny Bauer Grung. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
For this year’s presentation, Six Gallery team created a dreamy wheat ceiling installation by attaching 38,000 individual pieces of wheat—by hand!

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Six gallery by David Lopez Quincoces and Fanny Bauer Grung. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Six gallery by David Lopez Quincoces and Fanny Bauer Grung. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Housed in an abandoned monastery in the Navigli neighbourhood, Six Gallery is A hybrid space showcased the duo’s own beautiful new furniture collection alongside a selection of well-known and anonymous vintage pieces.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Quinconces–Dragò’s design office. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Quinconces–Dragò’s design office. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Next to the gallery is Quinconces–Dragò’s design office where all the magic happens.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Corso di Porta Ticinese. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Driving on one of my favourite streets in Milan – Corso di Porta Ticinese.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Bar Anne at Museo Diocesano. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Bar Anne at Museo Diocesano. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Set within the historical Museo Diocesano, Bar Anne brought together the biggest break out talents from the Netherlands. Architecture firm Space Encounters designed the framework for the installatinon (on the right).

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, 'Nothing New' by Lensvelt at Museo Diocesano. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, 'Nothing New' by Lensvelt at Museo Diocesano. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Also at Museo Diocesano, Nothing New by Lensvelt was a political statement and an installation-protest that attacks contemporary waste. Everything on show was bought on eBay or rented by individuals for the duration of the event.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, 'Elementi' by Paola Lenti. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, 'Elementi' by Paola Lenti. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Paola Lenti presented Elementi inside the industrial space on Via Orobia 15.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Toku shade structure by Vincent Van Duysen for Paola Lenti. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Via Orobia 15. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Toku shade structure by Vincent Van Duysen for Paola Lenti.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Fondazione Prada by OMA. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Fondazione Prada by OMA. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Fondazione Prada by OMA. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

The newly opened tower at Fondazione Prada by OMA, and me looking at it, melting from the heat and feeling fkng annoyed we couldn’t spare 4 hours to queue up and experience it first-hand. Dammit!

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, The Vereda festival at Marni. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, The Vereda festival at Marni. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

The Vereda festival at Marni was an evocative voyage into the colours, folklore and artisan traditions of Colombia. The joyous installation was inspired by tiny urban settlements in Columbia, becoming the backdrop to MARNI’s new collection of furnishings and accessories handmade by local women in Colombia.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Texturae set up a 70s-style club art-directed by Chiara Andreatti with Paradisoterrestre. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Rug by Christoph Hefti at Assab One. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: Inside the Amen showroom at Via Sirtori 32, the young wallpaper brand Texturae set up a 70s-style club art-directed by Chiara Andreatti, in collaboration with Paradisoterrestre, the vintage furniture brand founded by Dino Gavina. Right: Rug by Swiss designer Christoph Hefti at Assab One.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘That horse, slamming doors’ installation by Christoph Hefti at Assab One. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
‘That horse, slamming doors’ installation of textiles and ceramics by Christoph Hefti at Assab One.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, 'Almost Seen’ installation by Antoni Malinowski. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
London based, Polish born painter Antoni Malinowski’s installation ‘Almost Seen’ alternated the selection of light sensitive paintings with light specific wall drawings.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Alone Together’ installation by Johanna Grawunder at Assab One. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Called ‘Alone Together’, American architect Johanna Grawunder constructed two large paths of light and colour which the visitors could enter and have a walk through.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Alone Together’ installation by Johanna Grawunder at Assab One. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Alone Together’ installation by Johanna Grawunder at Assab One. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Johanna Grawunder’s bright hanging constructions in diverse material and the surrounding darkened space offered an experience of crossing between reality and vision (not to mention an excellent #TeamYellowtrace photo op – boom!)

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Alone Together’ installation by Johanna Grawunder at Assab One. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
‘Alone Together’ by Johanna Grawunder at Assab One.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Nilufar Depot. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Nilufar Depot. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Nilufar Depot celebrated the work of Italian-born Brazilian modernist architect Lina Bo Bardi. Nina Yashar gathered and exhibited the highest number of pieces ever designed by Bo Bardi under one roof. The exhibition was conceived by Space Caviar in collaboration with the graphic and design consulting firm Studio Vedèt.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Nilufar Depot. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Nilufar Depot was pulling pretty hard on my heartstrings during our visit. I fell in love with the screen by Marsica Fossati in Brass & Velvet Upholstery.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Nilufar Depot. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Nilufar Depot. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

There are countless beautiful corners at Nilufar Depot. Right: Guise Collection by Odd Matter for Nilufar seemed completely out of place, but that’s precisely what made is so damn exciting.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, HENRYTIMI showroom in Brera. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, HENRYTIMI showroom in Brera. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Over at HENRYTIMI showroom, we got a detailed tour by Mr HENRYTIMI himself of the many sublime, super-high end furniture/ kitchen/ joinery pieces.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, HENRYTIMI showroom in Brera. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, HENRYTIMI showroom in Brera. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Details from HENRYTIMI showroom in Brera.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Tempietto nel Bosco’ installation by Asif Khanat Palazzo Litta. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Our final stop this year was Palazzo Litta, where London-based architect Asif Khan created an installation ‘Tempietto nel Bosco’ (Temple in the Forest) – a grid of red-stained timber columns in the courtyard designed as a place of refuge for the visitors.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Tempietto nel Bosco’ installation by Asif Khanat Palazzo Litta. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Flowered Office by Manerba. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Tempietto nel Bosco’ installation by Asif Khanat Palazzo Litta. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left & Right: ‘Tempietto nel Bosco’ by Asif Khan. Middle: Flowered Office by Manerba.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ABCD seat by Faye Toogood for Takeyari. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Ron Arad for Nude Glass at Palazzo Litta. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Left: ABCD seat by Faye Toogood for Takeyari (Canvas). Right: Ron Arad for Nude Glass at Palazzo Litta.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Le Sfere di Gino Sarfatti exhibition by Astep at Palazzo Litta. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, Le Sfere di Gino Sarfatti exhibition by Astep at Palazzo Litta. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

Le Sfere di Gino Sarfatti exhibition by Astep at Palazzo Litta.

Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights, ‘Tempietto nel Bosco’ installation by Asif Khanat Palazzo Litta. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018
Milan Design Week 2018 Highlights. Photo © Nick Hughes | #Milantrace2018

One last view of Asif Khan ‘s ‘Tempietto nel Bosco’ through the window of Palazzo Litta. And PHEW – that’s it from me dearest Milantracers. I am knackered after this EPIC roundup of our week’s highlights! Love you long time, Mama Yellowtrace xx

 


[Photography © Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace. Dana Tomic Hughes dressed by and .]

 



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