#StoriesOnDesignByYellowtrace: The Art of Retail Pop-Ups.

 

Tis (almost) the season to be jolly, and we all know what that means. Retail Pop-Ups galore, right? Tell me about it, stud.

The retail scene has changed dramatically in the last few years. The GFC, internet shopping and sky rocketing rents have left a permanent mark on retailers around the world. With the rise of small business and a proliferation of emerging brands, coupled with increasingly design-savvy, sophisticated consumers who are always on the hunt for something exciting they haven’t seen before – the humble Retail Pop-Up concept has been elevated to an art form.

Forget the days when you could get your uncle to knock you up a sales counter from a bit of spare chipboard, when you could steal a couple of milk-crates and chuck the merch on a second-hand trestle table. No sir! Retail Pop-Ups have reached new heights and broken new ground, bringing about innovation, excitement and types of experiences the switched-on crowds are seeking out. A well orchestrated Pop-Up can send the world of (social) media on fire, and ought to be approached as an opportunity for a strategic Branding exercise, and a creation of a perfect PR storm, rather than simply being considered a vehicle for selling some cool shit for a limited amount of time.

Of course, it goes without saying that the first step for being able to deliver a remarkable and memorable Retail Pop-Up experience starts with Good Design – like, hello! – an articulate brief nailed with a killer concept, and kick-ass Art Direction and Styling as a cherry on top. Thank you very much.

So… By now you know the drill. Let’s dive into some of the most notable examples of Retail Pop-Ups that have caught our attention in the recent times. Boom!

p.s. As we are specifically focussing on Retail Pop-Ups today, please follow this link for more fascinating Pop-Ups we’ve talked about in the past, covering other disciplines such as Hospitality and Events. Ok, bye.

 

See More ‘Stories on Design’ Curated by Yellowtrace.

 

 

Felix and Frame Pop up Store by i29 at Felix Meritis Residence Amsterdam | Yellowtrace

Felix and Frame Pop up Store by i29 at Felix Meritis Residence Amsterdam | Yellowtrace

Felix and Frame Pop up Store by i29 at Felix Meritis Residence Amsterdam | Yellowtrace

Felix and Frame Pop up Store by i29 at Felix Meritis Residence Amsterdam | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of .

 

Frame Pop up Store at Felix Meritis Residence in Amsterdam // A collaboration between Felix & Foam, Frame and Foyer has led to a fruitful venue for art, culture and events to flourish. This creative centre was positioned in the historic  along one of Amsterdam’s main canals. In April 2014,  opened a pop-up store over two floors, which hosted exhibitions, fashion, design, video, performances and more. Dutch interiors studio i29 created a contemporary intervention of reflective partition walls complementing the grandeur of the Felix Meritis building’s Zuilenzaal interior by reflecting 18th century era columns and architectural details. Open for the duration of 6 months, the pop-up became the Dutch design magazine’s three dimensional experience, and an immersion into the creative and innovative design world.


 

Boffo Building Fashion 2013 by Neiheiser & Valle + Linda Farrow | Yellowtrace

Boffo Building Fashion 2013 by Neiheiser & Valle + Linda Farrow | Yellowtrace

Boffo Building Fashion 2013 by Neiheiser & Valle + Linda Farrow | Yellowtrace
Courtesy of . Photography by &

 

Boffo Building Fashion 2013 in NYC, by Neiheiser & Valle + Linda Farrow // 2013 was the second installation in BOFFO Building Fashion series, opened for a three week fashion and architecture retail installation by Linda Farrow + Office of Neiheiser & Valle. A shipping container and surrounding warehouse in New York City were radically transformed, inviting visitors to a unique public art experience. An endless landscape of stone and light by Neiheiser & Valle adjacent to the Hudson River provided the backdrop for more than just Linda Farrow’s collection of luxurious eyewear, but an experience that transformed the brand for its New York City fans.

For the installation, the architectural elements were minimised while the spatial qualities essential to both vision and illusion – deep space, radiance, and reflection – were maximised. The only objects present were the Linda Farrow glasses, suspended against an undulating environment of rich material qualities – coarse piles of stone, gold displays, ethereal mirrors, polished marble, and crisp light. Parallel walls of mirrored reflection multiplied the space in both directions, creating an infinite field that was both heavy and light, an expansive landscape paradoxically contained within the confines of a shipping container, an oasis of luxury and warmth unexpectedly discovered in a cold warehouse by the Hudson River.


 

Nude vs Naked Shoppable Exhibition At Modefabriek | Yellowtrace

Nude vs Naked Shoppable Exhibition At Modefabriek | Yellowtrace

Nude vs Naked Shoppable Exhibition At Modefabriek | Yellowtrace

Nude vs Naked Shoppable Exhibition At Modefabriek | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of .

 

Nude vs Naked Shoppable Exhibition At Modefabriek // In celebration of the 10th anniversary of a trade event  – a biannual trade show for fashion, footwear and accessories in Amsterdam – photographer Floor Knaapen and Grietje Schepers presented Nude vs Naked – a shop slash exhibition which coincided with the two-day-long event. The shoppable exhibition presented fashion, design and art from upcoming talents where products became part of an installation, revolving around the theme of nudity.


 

COS X Snarkitecture Pop up Collaboration at Austere | Yellowtrace

COS X Snarkitecture Pop up Collaboration at Austere | Yellowtrace

COS X Snarkitecture Pop up Collaboration at Austere | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of .

 

COS X Snarkitecture Popup Collaboration at Austere // Designed in collaboration with Daniel Arsham and Alex Mustonen of Brooklyn-based experimental design studio Snarkitecture, this COS pop-up was located inside Scandinavian concept store Austere. Playing with tones and reflections, COS and Snarkitecture created an exploration of form and silhouettes centred around a 6-meter floor-to-ceiling mirrored wall. With pink-hued steel and concrete sculptural displays anchoring the spatial conceptualisation, the collaborative store exemplifies Snarkitecture’s hallmark strength in utilising existing space to transform architecture into unexpected landscapes.

Related Story: Pink Perfection.


 

Hermesmatic: Hermes 80th Anniversary Laundromat Pop Up Concept | Yellowtrace

Hermesmatic: Hermes 80th Anniversary Laundromat Pop Up Concept | Yellowtrace

Hermesmatic: Hermes 80th Anniversary Laundromat Pop Up Concept | Yellowtrace

Hermesmatic: Hermes 80th Anniversary Laundromat Pop Up Concept | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of .

 

Hermèsmatic: Hermès 80th Anniversary Laundromat Pop Up Concept // In it’s preparation to celebrate the 80th anniversary of Hermès‘ signature silk scarves next year, the French luxury brand is launching a series of pop-up spaces, dubbed Hermèsmatic, where customers will be able to dye their old scarves to give them a new lease of life. Washing machines in the brand’s signature orange colour give scarves a blue or pink rinse, and a dryer restores them to their original softness. The process takes 48 hours and is free of charge.

The temporary stores are launching in Strasbourg, Amsterdam, Munich and Kyoto.


 

 

Arabica Coffee Kiosk in Kyoto City Art Museum by PUDDLE | Yellowtrace

Arabica Coffee Kiosk in Kyoto City Art Museum by PUDDLE | Yellowtrace

Arabica Coffee Kiosk in Kyoto City Art Museum by PUDDLE | Yellowtrace
Photography © .

 

Arabica Coffee Kiosk in Kyoto City Art Museum by PUDDLE // The Arabica Coffee Kiosk designed by Tokyo-based studio was created to visually complement the art exhibition. The translucent exterior made from a combination of aluminum and polycarbonate was developed to reference a greenhouse. The temporary structure employs straightforward techniques for set up and taking down, allowing the kiosk to be reinstalled at a diverse range of locations.


 

Everlane Fashion Store | Yellowtrace

Everlane Fashion Store | Yellowtrace

Everlane Fashion Store | Yellowtrace

Everlane Fashion Store | Yellowtrace

Everlane Fashion Store | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of .

 

Everlane’s Shoe Store Pop-Up designed by Robert Storey // Online fashion purveyor  recently launched two immersive pop-ups in New York, designed by London- and New York-based set designer . The first one Shoe Park – ran for just 10 days in May, while the second one in Soho (shown here) wrapped up at the end of last month. Both pop-ups contained a cafe, giving shoppers the opportunity to refresh and recharge. The self-guided store concept also followed a strict rule that all visitors had to leave their shoes at the door.


 

Shop 03 by i29 Interior Architects | Yellowtrace

Shop 03 by i29 Interior Architects | Yellowtrace

Shop 03 by i29 Interior Architects | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of . Photography by Brandwacht & Meijer.

 

Shop 03 by i29 for Frame Magazine // Dutch interior design studio i29 are serial ‘offenders’ in this story, this time with retail environment dubbed Shop 03. Flexibility and being able to completely change the display identity was the main focus for this store, as well as showcasing a creative and innovative world that surprised and invited exploration.

In response, i29 proposed a radical concept: two shops in one with the coexistence of contradictory atmospheres. From the front, a museological installation of white panels and black frames floated throughout the exhibit. Hanging from the walls, floor, and ceiling, these components were symbolic of a blank canvas, as the use of text and graphics provided by artists link back to FRAME’s origins. Looking from the back, the shop offered a totally different experience – triangular shaped display boards in black-stained timber showed the actual products behind the front panels. Genius.


 

Seek No Further Fruit of the Loom Pop up by Universal Design Studio | Yellowtrace

Seek No Further Fruit of the Loom Pop up by Universal Design Studio | Yellowtrace

Seek No Further Fruit of the Loom Pop up by Universal Design Studio | Yellowtrace
Photography by .

 

Seek No Further: Fruit of the Loom Pop-up by Universal Design Studio // In 2013, Barber and Osgerby’s Universal Design Studio created two pop-up shops in London and Berlin for the launch of Seek No Further, a new label from sportswear manufacturer Fruit of the Loom.

In London, a single 6.5-metre-long suspended rail showcased the Seek No Further capsule collection created by Dorothée Loermann. In Berlin, the original 60-square-metre gallery space was retained as a raw backdrop for a series of geometric shapes and plinths in soft pink silicone, royal blue flock and yellow cast glass wax.


 

Starbucks Pop up Cafe by Nendo in Tokyo | Yellowtrace

Starbucks Pop up Cafe by Nendo in Tokyo | Yellowtrace

Starbucks Pop up Cafe by Nendo in Tokyo | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of . Photography © .

 

Starbucks Pop-up café by Nendo in Tokyo // Nendo conceived the Starbucks pop-up in Tokyo known as the ‘Starbucks espresso journey’ where patrons were able to learn more about lattes, cappuccinos and cafe mochas. The space was designed to reflect a library setting – walls lined with rows upon rows of bookshelves encouraged visitors to freely explore the area.

The books were specially designed for the cafe via colour-coded covers – nine shades each represented a different espresso drink. Customers were able to browse the literature and choose the beverage that best suit their tastebuds. Their choice of book was then traded-in at the counter for an actual coffee. The concept for the pop-up shop was informed by the relationship between reading and enjoying a cup of coffee – fusing the two pleasures to create an interactive cafe experience.


 

 

Nike Womens Fall Presentation NYC Jen Brill Robert Storey Interior Design | Yellowtrace

Nike Womens Fall Presentation NYC Jen Brill Robert Storey Interior Design | Yellowtrace

Nike Womens Fall Presentation NYC Jen Brill Robert Storey Interior Design | Yellowtrace

Nike Womens Fall Presentation NYC Jen Brill Robert Storey Interior Design | Yellowtrace

Nike Womens Fall Presentation NYC Jen Brill Robert Storey Interior Design | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of . Photography by .

 

Nike Womenswear Pop-Up in NYC by Robert Storey Studio // Set designer  (another serial ‘offender’ in our Story) used the bright colours of Nike’s womenswear range to inform the neon-lit interior of the sports brand’s New York presentation.

Storey Studio created an artistic and immersive space that evoked femininity in an urban context. Taking soft colours and juxtaposing them against the angular language of the structure, the designers directly represented the collection within the cut outs of the framework. Iridescent light was used as a narrative throughout the four spaces, changing colour to guide the viewer from collection to fitting room to NTC training space. Materials were used in a playful and representational manner always bringing the viewer back to the core purpose – sport.


 

Nike Shoe Box Pop-Up in Shanghai by Rosie Lee | Yellowtrace

Nike Shoe Box Pop-Up in Shanghai by Rosie Lee | Yellowtrace

 

Nike’s Shoe Box Pop-Up in Shanghai by Rosie Lee // London-based agency , created a pop-up space as a fully immersive Air Max experience at Design Shanghai. The design team created an oversized Nike sneaker box with transparent walls featuring rows of air bubbles exhibiting rare examples of Air Max. Super cool. The concept invited clients to interact with Air Max, incorporating a digital pre-order station via iPad and opportunities to win competitions.


 

Eigen Huis and Interieur Pavilion at RAI Amsterdam by i29 | Yellowtrace

Eigen Huis and Interieur Pavilion at RAI Amsterdam by i29 | Yellowtrace

Eigen Huis and Interieur Pavilion at RAI Amsterdam by i29 | Yellowtrace

Eigen Huis and Interieur Pavilion at RAI Amsterdam by i29 | Yellowtrace

Eigen Huis and Interieur Pavilion at RAI Amsterdam by i29 | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of Courtesy of . Photography by & .

 

Eigen Huis and Interieur Pavilion at RAI Amsterdam by i29 // Dutch magazine  worked with i29 interior architects on their eye-catching, colour blocking pavilion at the annual design fair RAI in Amsterdam. i29 strived to make a surprising spatial experience for the visitors; an environment that needed be discovered step by step. The ‘house’ was reduced to the essence; open and closed surfaces, walls and volumes, sight lines. Contrast in colour and specular surfaces played with the perception of space. Mirrored volumes hid display cases which included compressed worlds which referred to living.


 

The Gourmet Tea by Alan Chu in Sao Paulo | Yellowtrace

The Gourmet Tea by Alan Chu in Sao Paulo | Yellowtrace

The Gourmet Tea by Alan Chu in Sao Paulo | Yellowtrace

The Gourmet Tea by Alan Chu in Sao Paulo | Yellowtrace
Photography by .

 

The Gourmet Tea by Alan Chu in São Paulo // This 25sqm tea store is a chameleon in its colour scheme and ability to disappear completely from view, epitomising the ultimate design game of Hide-and-Seek. Designed by Brazilian architect , the store is located within a shopping centre, with an interior that literally pops-up from behind the multi-coloured wall panels, with hidden cupboards that reveal tea shop merchandise, including a small kitchen. When the store is closed, the panels lie flush with the wall to show only a colour-blocked grid. Alan Chu’s inspiration came from the 35 colourful tea tins which are sold in The Gourmet Tea shop.


 

House Of Voltaire Melbourne Pop Up | Yellowtrace

House Of Voltaire Melbourne Pop Up | Yellowtrace

House Of Voltaire Melbourne Pop Up | Yellowtrace

House Of Voltaire Melbourne Pop Up | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of . Photography by .

 

House Of Voltaire’s Melbourne Pop Up // Earlier this year, independent London-based arts organisation, , set up its first Australian outlet in an historic Melbourne townhouse.  took over three-storeys of the Le Louvre building – formerly a fashion boutique, now owned by developers QIC Global Real Estate. Studio Voltaire scattered artworks throughout the house’s dark green interior, which was created by longterm collaborators .


 

 

Lightloft Melbourne & XO Light by Edwards Moore | Yellowtrace

Lightloft Melbourne & XO Light by Edwards Moore | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of . Photography by .

 

Lightloft in Melbourne & XO Light by Edwards Moore // Part sail loft, part lighting gallery & store, the lightloft was a temporary space created for the launch of the XO light. Inspired by yacht racing and sail shaping, the space aimed to communicate and showcase how the light is produced. The store also served as a home for a sail maker who fabricated the lights on-site.

Read the full article about this project & see more images here.


 

Louis Vuitton Tokyo Pop up | Yellowtrace

Louis Vuitton Tokyo Pop up | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of Louis Vuitton.

 

Louis Vuitton’s Tokyo Pop-up // Louis Vuitton’s menswear designer, Kim Jones, created this temporary retail space set inside Tokyo’s illustrious department store Isetan. The store featured limited edition merchandise curated by Hiroshi Fujiwara – hugely popular Japanese style guru, and a longtime friend of Jones. The pair collaborated on a capsule collection that fuses streetwear and high-end fashion into a hybrid range of products, including apparel items, bags, small leather goods and iPhone cases.


 

Mr Porter X Beams | Yellowtrace

Mr Porter X Beams | Yellowtrace
Photography of .

 

Mr Porter X Beams Exhibition in London designed by Schemata Architects/ Jo Nagasaka // Japanese fashion company  collaborated with , a menswear style and e-commerce destination from London, in a joint show “Mr Porter x Beams”. The installation took part during the Beams Japan project, with Retail wunderkid, Jo Nagasaka of Schemata Architects asked to design the exhibition.

Schemata took inspiration from clothes drying poles, originally used to sun-dry laundry at home, and transformed them into display rails for the clothing. Arrays of drying poles were reminiscent of a typical scene from old Japanese neighbourhoods.


 

Zuo Corp by Super Super and Inside/Outside | Yellowtrace

Zuo Corp by Super Super and Inside/Outside | Yellowtrace
Photography by Jacek Majewski.

 

Zuo Corp by Super Super and Inside/Outside in Warsaw // Mirrors lining the ceilings and walls of a tiny pop-up clothing shop in Warsaw created the illusion of endless rails of garments. Polish architects Super Super and Inside/Outside collaborated to design the temporary pavilion inside a mobile office container for clothing retailer Zuo Corp.

Lengths of LED lights surrounding the edges of the walls reflected in the mirrors and appeared to create an infinite illuminated grid. Ironically, the dressing room, had no mirrors inside at all.


 

Nicola Formichetti Pop Up Store | Yellowtrace
Image courtesy of .

 

Nicola Formichetti Pop-Up Store in NYC byGage Clemenceau Architects // In conjunction with 2011 New York City fashion week Nicola Formichetti partnered with , and non-profit to launch one seriously wild pop up store.

“Typically, fashion environments are defined by a rather restrained minimalism that focuses the attention only on the clothing– for the obvious reason of only selling clothes,” explain the architects. “In our collaboration with Nicola Formichetti, we rewrote this equation and produced a new genre of experimental space that not only showcased, but magnified the impact of his fashion designs into a new form of immersive environment that fused the very genetics of architecture and fashion. Such combinations of artistic disciplines have historic roots in the 19th century German term Gesamtkunstwerk, which describes mixing the more traditional “arts” of music, sculpture, painting, etc. We updated this ambition with new materials, new technologies, and new visual effects that have only recently become available and combined them with what was perhaps the most popular and increasingly important of the contemporary arts today– fashion.”


 

As Good As New pop up shop at SPRMRKT by i29 | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of As Good As New.

 

As Good As New pop-up shop by i29 in Amsterdam // Well isn’t this just a little bit clever? This pop-up shop for a second hand Dutch furniture brand As Good As New was located in one of Amsterdam’s super-cool fashion stores (who’s owner clearly isn’t a fan of vowels). The project was a collaboration between advertising agency Gummo, Dutch studio i29 (again!) and Krimpex coating systems.

The concept behind the furniture is simple – second hand pieces found at flea markets and op shops were coated in industrial spray-on plastic. The homogenous layer of matte grey tied the whole collection together, despite the fact all the pieces were wildly different – old-school computers, mannequins, ornaments, various furniture etc. Following the same principal, i29 coated everything at the pop-up shop itself to create a unified sculptural image. So wild!

Read the full article about this project & see more images here.


 

Pulsate installation design by Lily Jencks & Nathanael Dorent at Capitol Designer Studio, London | Yellowtrace

Pulsate installation design by Lily Jencks & Nathanael Dorent at Capitol Designer Studio, London | Yellowtrace
Images courtesy of Photography by

 

Pulsate installation design by Lily Jencks & Nathanael Dorent // Holy smokes! Talk about immediate visual overwhelm and super intense awesomeness. In your face – boom! You are looking at Pulsate – retail pop-up installation design by and for London tile showroom Capitol Designer Studio. The entire interior was wrapped in porcelain tiles in four different shades, creating a striking space that plays major tricks on the eye.

Read the full article about this project & see more images here.


 

Multiplex by Tom Dixon at LDF15, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace

Multiplex by Tom Dixon at LDF15, Photo © Nick Hughes | Yellowtrace
Photography by Nick Hughes/ Yellowtrace.

 

Multiplex by Tom Dixon at the Old Selfridges Hotel during LDF15 // MULTIPLEX was a month long exhibition brought to life by Tom Dixon and friends, set within the Old Selfridges Hotel in London. Held to coincide with four of the most important events on London’s creative calendar – London Fashion Week, London Design Festival, the BFI London Film Festival and the Frieze Art fair – MULTIPLEX brought together design, technology, fashion, film and interiors, exploring how the future of retail might look, sound, smell, taste and feel.

MULTIPLEX was built around the contributions of its collaborating brands, bringing their own ideas and experiences to the event. These included Wallpaper*, Sony, Caesarstone, Deliveroo, Resident, Mindblower.com and Moo.com. Dixon suggests the retail interiors business has been crushed by soaring rents and the growth of online shopping that a radical rethink such as his MULTIPLEX model may be its only chance of survival.

Read the full article about this project & see more images here.


 

Patrik Ervell pop up store by Graham Hudson New York | Yellowtrace

Patrik Ervell pop up store by Graham Hudson New York | Yellowtrace

Patrik Ervell pop up store by Graham Hudson New York | Yellowtrace
Photography by .

 

Patrik Ervell pop-up store by Graham Hudson in New York // Menswear designer  moved into the eponymous Boffo space in New York’s Tribeca back in 2011. The location at that time was housing a series of five engineered pop-up stores devoted to innovative designers (including the Nicola Formichetti installation shown in this Story). As an ode to condemned spaces, architect and sculptor, , created an atmosphere of total demolition. The interior showcased space that felt more like an obliterated war-zone, rather than a typical, streamlined fashion boutique. Bold strategy, Cotton.


 



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