Plastic Ocean by Thirza Schaap | Yellowtrace
‘Home.’

Plastic Ocean by Thirza Schaap | Yellowtrace
‘Bunny.’

Plastic Ocean by Thirza Schaap | Yellowtrace
‘Frozen’

Plastic Ocean by Thirza Schaap | Yellowtrace
‘Princess.’

Plastic Ocean by Thirza Schaap | Yellowtrace
‘Fruit.’

Plastic Ocean by Thirza Schaap | Yellowtrace
‘Spring.’

 

Dutch artist has an altruistic purpose behind her fragile and beautiful art pieces. She wants to draw attention to the pollution in the world’s oceans. More specifically, she wants to draw attention to the phenomenal levels of plastic we dump into them.

Schaap collects the random plastic pieces, toothbrushes, straws, flip-flops, bottles, any object really that washes up on the beach. Her childhood habit of collecting seashells and stones continued into adulthood. But this time she found herself filling her pockets with man made objects instead of natural ones. Initially, she started by picking up the debris and photographing it, but the idea soon expanded.

“ is an art project, which I started to create awareness around pollution to try and prevent (or at least reduce) plastic pollution,” said Schaap.

 

Related:
Recycled Beauty by Laurie Frankel.

Magical Landscapes Created Within Plastic Bags By Vilde Rolfsen.

 

Plastic Ocean by Thirza Schaap | Yellowtrace
‘Prom.’

Plastic Ocean by Thirza Schaap | Yellowtrace
‘Flirt.’

Plastic Ocean by Thirza Schaap | Yellowtrace
‘Shattered.’

Plastic Ocean by Thirza Schaap | Yellowtrace
‘Holes.’


‘Sale.’

Plastic Ocean by Thirza Schaap | Yellowtrace
‘Best Before.’

 

Now she takes the rubbish home to dry and sorts all the pieces. Then she ‘plays’ with the abandoned items taking each piece and laying it out, making a collage of sorts, pretty debris made into still life arrangements. She photographs the finished artwork on pastel sheets of paper or sand and shoots them in bright, natural daylight.

“In making artistic sculptures out of the objects I find, I try to evoke an emotional response from my audience by creating a contradiction. A clash between initial aesthetic attraction and after a second look: repulsion and the realisation of the tragedy trash causes,” she said.

There’s no doubt Schaap’s artworks are interesting and pretty, although some might argue they are a long way from being adequately alarming or insightful. Whiles she certainly hasn’t set out to glamourise all the plastic waste in our oceans, it would be easy to wrongly fall for her pretty pictures, glossing over the potential ecological disaster of the rubbish that we carelessly leave behind.

 

Related:
Recycled Beauty by Laurie Frankel.

Magical Landscapes Created Within Plastic Bags By Vilde Rolfsen.

 

 


[Images courtesy of .]

 

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About The Author

Susanna McArdle

Susanna has a background in Interior Architecture and a passion for writing. Based in Sydney, she has worked both in Asia and Australia designing. An avid writer, it’s hard to know what she prefers more, stringing words together or creating spaces. But one thing she does know, is that she loves doing the both together.

3 Responses

  1. Avatar
    Antonis

    Unfortunately my reaction when seeing this imagery was not positive.

    This article pretty much says it all, and hence I don’t particularly feel that there is anything romantic about plastic.

    Reply
  2. Avatar
    Johnb

    Hey. Let’s worry about human life. Iran, Iraq, ISIS, earthquake and hurricane victims. The amount of rubbish in the sea is minimal compared to life on land. And by the way, the artwork is quite good, but only as photographs.

    Reply

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